Being an HIV 50+ Scholar at USCA 2018

By Christine Kapi’ioho

Christine Kapi'ioho This was my first time attending USCA and I was absolutely honored and privileged to attend. Coming all the way from Maui, Hawaii and being part Native-Hawaiian and a woman, I learned that there was now a designation for our race under the Constituent Advisory Panels (CAPs) for 2018. We, as Hawaiians are no longer lumped into another category but instead have our own panel which is amazing. Now, there are five CAPs; African American, American Indian and Alaskan Native, Asian, Latinx, and Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander. I was able to attend the breakout session on the first day, entitled: Ka Hikina o Ka La – The Dawning of a New Day and luckily it did not conflict with any of my HIV50+ Scholar sessions that were recommended to attend. The session was so informative and was presented by my colleagues throughout the State of Hawaii. I felt that as a Scholar being at the conference was a chance to show that Hawaiians are still around on this planet, that our voices should be heard, and that our Native Hawaiian HIV-positive individuals should be recognized. I thought of my clients whom I serve where I work and how it would be so special to have other Hawaiians attend in 2019. I dreamed of how beneficial it would be to them mentally and to show them they are not alone and that other minorities are not isolating themselves or being ashamed of their status.

I am inspired by all the knowledge and information at the conference. Sometimes I was a little overwhelmed by it all but at the same time going, the fire inside being re-kindled and ignited to a brighter flame so that I can continue the work that I do as Director of Client Services. I come back to my agency, ready to start a stand-alone 50+ HIV positive group to serve those aging with HIV and address their specific, “aging” needs. I also come back to the office ready to do what it takes to bring other Native Hawaiian peoples to the conference in 2019. Thank you NMAC and USCA for allowing me the chance to attend USCA. I plan to bring others in 2019.

With Aloha,
Christine Kapi’ioho

Important Happenings in HIV/Health Policy

Important Happenings
in HIV/Health Policy

Week Ending: August 10, 2018
By: Matthew Rose & Sable K. Nelson

NOTE: The House is now in recess until September 4. The Senate is on its scheduled recess until Wednesday, August 15.

 

INPUT REQUESTED: A National Community-Led Plan to End HIV/AIDS as an Epidemic

Since 2014, several U.S. cities, counties, and states have announced Ending the Epidemic (EtE) plans. What makes these initiatives unique– in addition to their ambition– is that they are driven by community leaders, including people living with HIV. In the spirit of the Denver Principles, these plans should be by and for those communities directly impacted by the epidemic. Recently, the Trump administration has announced that it will draft its own national EtE plan by mid-2019. This obviously raises many concerns. First and foremost, can the drafting of such a plan possibly truly be led by the communities disproportionately impacted by the epidemic, when these very communities are facing direct attacks by the current administration? In order to preserve the community-led spirit of EtE work, Act Now End AIDS (ANEA) – a national coalition of EtE leaders – intends to draft a community-led national plan. We will engage in a broad, multi-tiered process to collect as much information from impacted communities around the country as possible in order to accurately reflect what we need to end the HIV epidemic for all of us.
To add your comments, CLICK http://www.nmac.org/input-requested-a-national-community-led-plan-to-end-hiv-aids-as-an-epidemic/

 

WATCH: AIDS 2018: What Happened and What’s Next?

The Kaiser Family Foundation and the Global Health Policy Center at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) held a briefing to assess the major outcomes of the 2018 International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2018), held from July 23-27 in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The discussion touched on the latest scientific developments; the current funding climate for the AIDS response; and other major developments to the field emerging from the conference. The panel included:

  • Ambassador Deborah L. Birx, the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator;
  • Chris Beyrer, professor at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and past president of the International AIDS Society;
  • Jen Kates, KFF vice president and director of Global Health and HIV Policy;
  • Greg Millett, Vice President and Director, Public Policy, at amfAR; and
  • Stephen Morrison, senior vice president and director of the Global Health Policy Center at CSIS.

For more information, WATCH  https://www.kff.org/global-health-policy/event/august-10-event-aids-2018-what-happened-and-whats-next/?utm_campaign=KFF-2018-August-HIV-Event-International-AIDS-Conference&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=65160034&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-9gHHBVSS5wS2kNwVWE3GXjX82BGYJ7_z5cGNfHwfuGED9fYE0Y03haRuxh06y0HA8SE4wdPZakxNKHRIPN-aCBI1a8PQ&_hsmi=65160034

 

Protect Medicaid a Key Part of the Social Safety Net

The purpose of Medicaid is to provide health care to low-income people. But in Kentucky, the state estimated 95,000 people would lose Medicaid. A federal judge ruled that Kentucky’s waiver could not be approved, because HHS hadn’t taken into account the likelihood that their policies would run counter to Medicaid’s purpose. So HHS has reopened the comment period on Kentucky’s Medicaid work requirement waiver plan through August 18 (this Saturday at 11:00 p.m. ET). They are looking to get more comments favoring work requirements.  HHS Secretary Alex Azar wants to approve them, despite the court’s ruling. But the judge was persuaded by the previous comments that the KY policy would deny medical assistance, not provide it. And Mississippi has its own waiver request for work requirements.  Parents in Mississippi can only qualify for Medicaid if their income is less than 27 percent of the poverty line ($84 a week for a mom and child). It’s a classic Catch-22: if very poor parents enrolled in Mississippi Medicaid don’t work, they will lose their health care. If they do work enough to comply, they will earn too much to qualify for Medicaid and will lose their health care.

Our friends at the Coalition on Human Need have created a template to submit your comments on the issue.

Click here for the link to have your voice heard on this issue 

The dangerous public charge conversation is back

Trump Administration is again looking at the issue of public charge. This policy would again tear apart families. If it moves forward, it would target legal immigrants who make less than $63,000 a year and their children. Trump is punishing people who wait years for a visa to come to America, work hard, and build a better life for themselves and their family. As many as 100 million people in the U.S. would fail themselves. Trump’s anti-immigrant attacks put families in danger.

For more information, VISIT → https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/poverty/reports/2018/07/19/453174/trumps-immigration-plan-imposes-radical-new-income-health-tests/ 

 

What You Can Do

TAKE ACTION: It is very important that our elected officials hear from us to protect federal HIV funding for HIV prevention and care.  Speak truth to power by sharing your personal stories with your elected officials. It is vitally important to meet your federal elected officials when they are at home. If we don’t support and advocate for HIV funding and programs, who will?  Our movement cannot afford to stand on the sidelines.  Your U.S. Senators and U.S. Representatives need to hear from you.

Also, MAKE SURE THAT YOU ARE REGISTERED TO VOTE in time for the primary and general elections happening this year:

Wyoming 8/21/2018
New Hampshire 8/29/2018

For more information, VISIT→ https://www.eac.gov/voters/register-and-vote-in-your-state/

Finally, PARTICIPATE IN THE PRIMARY ELECTION(S) in your state:

Alaska 8/21/2018
Wyoming 8/21/2018
Arizona 8/28/2018
Florida 8/28/2018

For more information, VISIT→ http://www.ncsl.org/research/elections-and-campaigns/2018-state-primary-election-dates.aspx

 

What NMAC is Doing About It

  • NMAC remains vigilant in its advocacy to protect FY19 government funding and the existence of the social safety net.

NMAC released a Biomedical HIV Prevention “Blueprint” entitled Expanding Access to Biomedical HIV Prevention: Tailoring Approaches for Effectively Serving Communities of Color, a new report that establishes strategies to effectively use techniques such as Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and Treatment as Prevention (TasP) to end the HIV epidemic in communities x`of color. The full report can be found by visiting www.nmac.org/blueprint

Constituent Spotlight: Edward Jackson

HIV, aging, and leadership, have characterized my life in differentways for three decades. Each has impacted how I define my life in various ways. As a person aging with HIV, thriving with the virus began as a complication but now, with time and wisdom, has been reduced to an endearing contradiction.

Thriving with HIV 20 or 30 years ago was like aging prematurely with the physical frailty, awareness of my mortality, and the common fact of life for the elderly: the frequent death of friends.

The constant funerals and memorials always left me fearing my imminent and premature death. I was uncertain that even death might not ensure relief as I remember when funeral homes would not bury dead friends or when I met relatives of the dead who had shunned their children. Death was often defined by pain, shame, confusion, and isolation.

Unconsciously, I became stronger by will, tougher by faith, and more calculated and determined as I learned to navigate biased providers, economic trap doors, and impossible social service systems. I became a professional student, without designing a strategy towards that end.  Again, without a deliberate plan, I received training to write more effectively, support to deliver messages to our communities more effectively, and develop my voice, that is now heard on boards and advisory bodies and in individual settings.

Somehow, this plague of a virus, this bullseye of stigma and shame, became the springboard for my role as a leader.  As I fought for my life and for my strength through the early years, I now apply lessons learned to fight disparities in our communities.  I am part of a community of advocates and peer educators who, through many varied routes, have distinguished ourselves by thriving not simply surviving.

My initiative is my own, but my capacity in this field comes from countless trainers, providers, and associates. My wisdom is my own but my developed influence in the HIV primary care world has been born of compassion, empathy, and experience as a caregiver for the weak and dying.  My authority comes from what I owe them, myself, and those I will meet tomorrow.

I embody a global movement that has evolved into a worldwide model of chronic care and peer support.  We have defined an epidemic. It has not defined me (us).

I practice self-care. I initiate and value partnerships on local, state, national and global levels.  I consult with academic, clinical, faith-based, and healthcare systems to disseminate in ever-changing, innovative venues.  I draw from my lessons learned as a Gay, African-American man in America. Every assault every fear and aggression I have experienced has transformed into the powerful foundation that frames my advocacy to be the change I seek.

My leadership is valued in the HIV and chronic care world and comes from working with marginalized individuals, People of Color, and LGBTQ communities. The challenges of HIV & Aging still represent an enormous gift and paradox.  This gift defines my commitment to this life-giving, life-changing vision to the reduce stigma, provide education, and end HIV in our lives.

NMAC Recognizes National HIV Testing Day

National HIV Testing Day Statement

Today (June 27) marked National HIV Testing Day! I encourage our NMAC Community to use what this day means by holding ourselves and our loved ones accountable. Each of us should be committed to making sure that we know our status (AND that those we care about know their status).

According to the CDC, an estimated 1,122,900 adults and adolescents were living with HIV at the end of 2015 in the United States. Of those, 162,500 (15 percent) were not aware of their status. While this is a relative decrease, population specific disparities exist. For example, being unaware of one’s status is particularly prevalent in youth. According to the CDC, among people aged 13-24 with HIV, an estimated 51 percent didn’t know their status when they tested positive. Since communities of color, especially in the south, are disproportionately impacted by HIV, it is imperative that we harness our collective power to change this narrative.

Right now, we have the behavioral and biomedical tools to prevent HIV. Knowing your status is the first step in ending the epidemic. From there, the goal is two-fold: (1) in the event that an individual tests positive, we must link those individuals to care and set them on the path to treatment adherence and/or viral suppression; and (2) in the event that an individual tests negative, we should educate that person about pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). This week, Representative Barbara Watson Coleman (NJ-12) introduced a resolution written in consultation with NMAC and several national HIV and STD partners which encourages the U.S. House of Representatives to support increasing PrEP awareness and education in an attempt to reduce the number of seroconversions in the United States.

As an organization, NMAC is committed to doing all we can to end the HIV epidemic in the near future. In addition to my professional advocacy, I’m personally committed to #DoingItMyWay. At my well women’s exam earlier this month, I intentionally requested an HIV test. Both after taking the test and receiving the results, I also encouraged my partner, several of my sorority sisters, and cousins to empower themselves by doing the same. Can I count on you to get yourself or someone you care about tested for HIV today? For more information about where to get an HIV test near you, visit: https://locator.aids.gov/.

Yours in the Struggle,


Sable K. Nelson
Policy Analyst
NMAC

Statement from HIV, STD & Hepatitis Policy Partnership on Meeting with CDC Director Robert Redfield


 

Statement from HIV, STD & Hepatitis Policy Partnership on Meeting with CDC Director Robert Redfield

 

Washington, D.C. – Last week, the executive directors of the National HIV, STD & Hepatitis Policy Partnership met with Robert Redfield, M.D., the new director of the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC). During our very encouraging meeting, the partnership advanced a series of requests and had a productive discussion about ending the HIV epidemic and the intersecting epidemics of STDs, viral hepatitis and opioid misuse. Dr. Redfield committed to an ongoing collaboration and a process that would seek broad community input around any newly developed strategies to end these epidemics. We look forward to working with Dr. Redfield and his team as well as other relevant federal agencies and the community in realizing these goals.

The executive directors of the National H,I,V, S,T,D & Hepatitis Policy Partnership with Robert Redfield, M.D., the new director of the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC)
(L to R: Mitch Wolfe, Acting Director, CDC Washington Office; Paul Kawata, Executive Director, NMAC; Murray Penner, Executive Director, NASTAD; David Harvey, Executive Director, NCSD; Dr. Robert Redfield, Director, CDC; Jesse Milan, Jr., President & CEO, AIDS United; Michael Ruppal, Executive Director, The AIDS Institute; Jonathan Mermin, Director, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP))

 

####

 

Important Happenings in HIV/Health Policy

Important Happenings in HIV/Health Policy

Week Ending: June 15, 2018
By: Matthew Rose & Sable K. Nelson

House Marking Up Federal Fiscal Year 2019 Appropriations Bill

On Friday, June 15, 2018 the Labor, Health and Human Services (Labor-HHS) Subcommittee of the U.S. House Appropriation Committee marked up its Federal Fiscal Year 2019 (FY19) Appropriations bills. Passing along party lines, the House’s Labor HHS spending bill would increase HHS’s budget by $1 billion for FY19. “Markup” is the process by which a Congress debates, amends, and rewrites proposed legislation. An appropriations bill is a piece of legislation that sets money aside for specific government spending. This is the third step in the Federal Budget Process:

Here are the funding levels proposed by the House Labor-HHS Subcommittee for key HIV/AIDS programs:

The Senate version of the Labor-HHS spending bill set top-line spending $2 billion higher than the House version. It is unknown at this time how those funds will be allocated for each of the Senate Labor-HHS spending bill will be marked up in the upcoming days/weeks.

 

NEXT STEPS: In the coming weeks, tentatively scheduled for June 26, the full House Appropriations Committee is expected to mark up the Labor-HHS bill. It is likely that several Representatives will propose amendments targeting federal funding for programs impacting minority health, rural health, Title X family planning, operation of supervised consumption facilities, and programs affiliated with the Affordable Care Act that the current spending bill proposes reducing or eliminating.

 

CDC Releases its 2017 YRBS Data

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released its latest data from its Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS). The YRSSS monitors six categories of health-related behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death and disability among youth and adults, including:

  • Behaviors that contribute to unintentional injuries and violence
  • Sexual behaviors related to unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV infection
  • Alcohol and other drug use
  • Tobacco use
  • Unhealthy dietary behaviors
  • Inadequate physical activity

Below is a table that summarizes the “Progress At-A-Glance for Sexual Behavior Variables:”

For more information, READ → https://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/data/yrbs/index.htm; https://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/data/yrbs/pdf/trendsreport.pdf

 

What You Can Do

TAKE ACTION: It is very important that our elected officials hear from us to protect federal HIV funding for HIV prevention and care.  Speak truth to power by sharing your personal stories with your elected officials. It is vitally important to meet your federal elected officials when they are at home. If we don’t support and advocate for HIV funding and programs, who will?  Our movement cannot afford to stand on the sidelines.  Your U.S. Senators and U.S. Representatives need to hear from you.

 

Also, MAKE SURE THAT YOU ARE REGISTERED TO VOTE in time for the primary and general elections happening this year!

For more information, VISIT→ https://www.eac.gov/voters/register-and-vote-in-your-state/

 

Finally, PARTICIPATE IN THE PRIMARY ELECTION(S) in your state:

For more information, VISIT→ http://www.ncsl.org/research/elections-and-campaigns/2018-state-primary-election-dates.aspx


What NMAC is Doing About It

  • NMAC remains vigilant in its advocacy to protect FY19 government funding and the existence of the social safety net.
  • NMAC will meet with hill staff to support amendments that are favorable for our programs.
  • NMAC is also working with lawmakers to address PrEP access and HIV in the military in a new partnership.

Important Happenings in HIV/Health Policy

Important Happenings in HIV/Health Policy

Week Ending: June 15, 2018
By: Matthew Rose & Sable K. Nelson


Nation’s Leading HIV, STD and Hepatitis
Organizations Gravely Concerned by Trump


Administration’s Refusal to Defend ACA
Five of the nation’s leading HIV, STD, and viral hepatitis organizations expressed grave concern today at the Trump Administration’s decision not to defend critical components of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in legal challenges brought by the state of Texas. By failing to defend the law’s central pre-existing conditions protections, AIDS UnitedNASTAD, the National Coalition of STD DirectorsNMAC, and The AIDS Institute fear that this Administration has abandoned millions of Americans with chronic or pre-existing conditions, including HIV, hepatitis, and other STDs, who rely on the ACA for access to critical, affordable health care coverage. For more information,

READ → http://www.nmac.org/nations-leading-hiv-std-and-hepatitis-organizations-gravely-concerned-by-trump-administrations-refusal-to-defend-aca/


House Marking Up Federal Fiscal Year 2019 Appropriations Bill

On Friday, June 15, 2018, the Labor, Health and Human Services Subcommittee of the U.S. House Appropriation Committee will mark up the Federal Fiscal Year 2019 Appropriations bills.  Markup is the process by which a Congress debates, amends, and rewrites proposed legislation. An appropriations bill is a piece of legislation that sets money aside for specific government spending. This is the third step in the Federal Budget Process:

 

What You Can Do

TAKE ACTION: It is very important that our elected officials hear from us to protect federal funding for HIV prevention and care. Speak truth to power by sharing your personal stories with your elected officials. It is vitally important to meet your federal elected officials when they are at home. If we don’t support and advocate for HIV funding and programs, who will?  Our movement cannot afford to stand on the sidelines. Your U.S. Senators and U.S. Representatives need to hear from you. 

Also, MAKE SURE THAT YOU ARE REGISTERED TO VOTE in time for the primary and general elections happening this year:

Colorado 6/18/2018

 For more information, VISIT→ https://www.eac.gov/voters/register-and-vote-in-your-state/

Finally, PARTICIPATE IN THE PRIMARY ELECTION(S) in your state:

District of Columbia

Utah    

New York        

Oklahoma        

Maryland        

Colorado         

6/19/2018

6/26/2018

6/26/2018

6/26/2018

6/26/2018

6/26/2018

For more information, VISIT→ http://www.ncsl.org/research/elections-and-campaigns/2018-state-primary-election-dates.aspx

 

What NMAC is Doing About It

  • NMAC remains vigilant in its advocacy to protect FY19 government funding and the existence of the social safety net.
  • NMAC releaseda Biomedical HIV Prevention “Blueprint” entitled Expanding Access to Biomedical HIV Prevention: Tailoring Approaches for Effectively Serving Communities of Color, a new report that establishes strategies to effectively use techniques such as Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and Treatment as Prevention (TasP) to end the HIV epidemic in communities of color. The full report can be found by visiting nmac.org/blueprint.
 

 

DESPITE PROGRESS IN NATIONAL HIV/AIDS STRATEGY PROGRESS REPORT, MUCH WORK STILL TO BE DONE

For Immediate Release
Contact: Chip Lewis, 202.853.1846, clewis@nmac.org

DESPITE PROGRESS IN NATIONAL HIV/AIDS STRATEGY PROGRESS REPORT, MUCH WORK STILL TO BE DONE

 

June 11, 2018 – The 2017 Progress Report on the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (link) shows that progress is being made in some areas, but much work still needs to be done in other areas to not only reach the strategy’s goals for 2020 but to prevent any loss of progress made.

While NMAC applauds the fact that progress targets were met to reduce HIV diagnosis disparities among Black women and increase viral suppression among youth and transgender women, it is disappointing to see that the strategy failed to reach its targets for reducing HIV diagnosis disparities among young, black gay and bisexual men and among people in the southern United States.

“The latest NHAS progress report shows that we still have a tremendous amount of work ahead of us,” said Paul Kawata, NMAC’s Executive Director. “The fact that we failed to reach our targets in the southern United States, currently the epicenter of the HIV epidemic, is particularly discouraging. And the fact that we continue to lose ground in HIV diagnosis for young, Black gay and bisexual men is crushing. Young, Black gay and bisexual men now have a 50 percent chance of becoming HIV-positive during their lives. Meeting our goals with these communities will help us achieve our goal of ending the epidemic and end needless suffering.”

 

NMAC leads with race to urgently fight for health equity and racial justice to end the HIV epidemic in America. Since 1987, NMAC has advanced our mission through a variety of programs and services, including: a public policy education program, national and regional training conferences, a treatment and research program, numerous electronic and print materials, and a website: www.nmac.org. NMAC also serves as an association of AIDS service organizations, providing valuable information to community-based organizations, hospitals, clinics, and other groups assisting individuals and families affected by the HIV epidemic.

###

One Week Left for USCA Early Bird Registration!

Just One Week Left for USCA Early Bird Rates!

USCA’s Early Bird rates for conference registration and booth reservation end on June 8!  Don’t wait to reserve your place at USCA. Register and reserve your booth space now.

 

HIV & Transgender Community Spotlight Webinar is June 20

Join NMAC for our next Community Spotlight webinar on June 20, when we will look at HIV among Transgender Americans. Our presenter will be Luis Gutierrez-Mock, TRIUMPH Project Director at the Center of Excellence for Transgender Health. Register now.
.

Join Our HIV Navigation Evaluation Webinar June 13

NMAC‘s Capacity Building Division will present A Novel Demonstration of HIV Navigation Evaluation webinar Wednesday, June 13, from 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EDT.

This webinar will introduce participants to basic monitoring and evaluation elements of HIV Navigation Services (HNS) by way of the CDC’s Prevention with Positives (PwP) in Action Novel (a CDC video). Register now.
For more information please contact linc@nmac.org.

June 5 is HIV Long-Term Survivors Day

June 5 is HIV Long-Term Survivors Day, a time to celebrate and honor long-term survivors of the epidemic and raise awareness of their needs, issues, and journeys.

This year, we will feature long-term survivors from our 50+ Strong & Healthy program talking about their lives and what they would tell young people living with HIV. Watch our social media platforms (Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram) on Monday, June 5.

 

The Latest HIV News from DC

It’s been a busy week for NMAC’s Policy team with the introduction of the Health Equity and Accountability Act of 2018 and the proposed Domestic Gag Rule. We’ll need your help to make the difference on these important issues. Read the latest update from them.

Important Happenings in HIV/Health Policy

Important Happenings in HIV/Health Policy

Week Ending: May 25, 2018
By: Matthew Rose & Sable K. Nelson

Health Equity and Accountability Act Introduced in the House

Rep. Barbara Lee – on behalf of the Congressional Tri-Caucus made up the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus, Congressional Black Caucus, and the Congressional Hispanic Caucus – introduced The Health Equity and Accountability Act of 2018 (HEAA), H.R. 5942. The introduction of HEAA in the Senate will be forthcoming from Sen. Mazi K. Hirono. In addition to Senator Hirono and Rep. Lee, dozens of members of the Congressional Tri-Caucus have co-sponsored the bill.

HEAA builds upon the strengths of the ACA and provides the additional tools necessary to address and eliminate health and health care disparities experienced by minority and underserved communities. The bill will eliminate existing access barriers to affordable health insurance coverage, promote investments in innovative health delivery methods and technologies, and advance research and data collection about the health needs and outcomes of diverse communities. The bill also ensures that a full range of culturally and linguistically appropriate health care and public health services are available and accessible in every community, creates a pipeline and new training opportunities for minority-serving professional and allied health care workers, and incorporates strategies to address a range of disease-specific mental and behavioral health issues facing minority communities. These are all important steps toward eliminating racial and ethnic health disparities, and creating a sustainable health care system that can pave the road to health equity. For more information,
READ this op-ed co-authored by  Reps. Lee and Chu in The Hill → http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/healthcare/388977-health-equity-bill-offers-blueprint-for-nation-at-time-of; https://www.apiahf.org/resource/heaa_section_overview/

 


Trump Administration Proposes ‘Domestic Gag’ Rule
On May 22, 2018, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced a proposed change to a regulation that would affect the Title X program. Federally-funded Title X family planning clinics play a critical role in ensuring access to a broad range of family planning and preventive health services. The proposed regulation change would restrict family planning funding from certain health-care providers, such as Planned Parenthood, and block providers that participate in the Title X program from referring their patients for abortions. It is being referred to as the domestic gag rule, as it would likely prevent federal funding from going to any health clinic that even mentions abortion as an option for women. Comments on the proposed rule would be due 60 days after it is published in the Federal Register. However, HHS has not yet announced when it publish the proposed regulation. For more information,
READ → 
https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/trump-new-domestic-gag-rule-planned-parenthood_us_5afef8cce4b0a046186b2e39

 

Understanding the Trump Administration’s Plan to Lower Prescription Drug Costs
Sarah Jane Tribble from the Kaiser Health Network explained the key elements of the 44-page document entitled “American Patients First; The Trump Administration Blueprint to Lower Drug Prices and Reduce Out-of-Pocket Costs” https://www.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/AmericanPatientsFirst.pdf ) on CBS News’ “Red & Blue.” For more information,
WATCH →
https://www.cbsnews.com/video/trumps-feud-with-prescription-drug-costs-began-during-his-campaign-and-continues-today/; https://khn.org/news/watch-whats-in-the-white-house-plan-to-lower-drug-prices/?utm_campaign=KHN%20-%20Weekly%20Edition&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=63242968&_hsenc=p2ANqtz–hb5VddnTmF2_hUdnmdQqomGW787zhjNampBkczXpbYfijgtABc17Pbkinzk9pZiljhI1d58KusoSIOv7TJ4l2sBqBSA&_hsmi=63242968

 

What NMAC is Doing About It

  • NMAC remains vigilant in its advocacy to protect FY19 government funding and the existence of the social safety net.
  • NMAC releaseda Biomedical HIV Prevention “Blueprint” entitled Expanding Access to Biomedical HIV Prevention: Tailoring Approaches for Effectively Serving Communities of Color, a new report that establishes strategies to effectively use techniques such as Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and Treatment as Prevention (TasP) to end the HIV epidemic in communities of color. The full report can be found by visiting nmac.org/blueprint.
  • NMAC will work with partners to determine its response to the pending domestic gag rule

 

What You Can Do About It.

TAKE ACTION: Speak truth to power by sharing your personal stories with your elected officials. It is vitally important to meet to your federal elected officials when they are at home. If we don’t support and advocate for HIV funding and programs, who will?  Our movement cannot afford to stand on the sidelines.  Your U.S. Senators and U.S. Representatives need to hear from you. 

Also, MAKE SURE THAT YOU ARE REGISTERED TO VOTE  in time for the primary and general elections happening this year:

New York 6/1/2018
Oklahoma 6/1/2018
Maryland 6/5/2018
Colorado 6/18/2018

 For more information, VISIT→ https://www.eac.gov/voters/register-and-vote-in-your-state/

Finally, PARTICIPATE IN THE PRIMARY ELECTION(S) in your state:

Mississippi 06/05/2018
Montana 06/05/2018
New Mexico 06/05/2018
New Jersey 06/05/2018
Alabama 06/05/2018
South Dakota 06/05/2018
California 06/05/2018
Iowa 06/05/2018
South Carolina 06/12/2018
Nevada 06/12/2018
Virginia 06/12/2018
Maine 06/12/2018
North Dakota 06/12/2018
District of Columbia 06/19/2018
Utah 06/19/2018
New York 06/26/2018
Oklahoma 06/26/2018
Maryland 06/26/2018
Colorado

06/26/2018

For more information, VISIT→ http://www.ncsl.org/research/elections-and-campaigns/2018-state-primary-election-dates.aspx